Filmmaker Series – Part 4 Q&A with Daniel Wirtberg

Filmmaker Series – Part 4 Q&A with Daniel Wirtberg For the fourth instalment in our Q&A series with last year’s Aesthetica Short Film Competition winners…

A Pictorial Stream of Consciousness: Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Sprüth Magers, London.

Review by Jessica Jones-Berney As I follow the row of Philip-Lorca diCorcia Polaroids lined up against the otherwise sparse white walls of Sprüth Magers, it…

Spatial Form in Social and Aesthetic Processes: Concrete Geometries, AA, London.

Review by Nathan Breeze Concrete Geometries is an ongoing research initiative at the Architectural Association directed by Marianne Mueller and Olaf Kneer. Derived from ‘Concrete…

The Crucible: York Theatre Royal, Finishes Saturday 28 May – Don’t Miss It

Review by Grace Henderson Exposed, enclosed, surrounded – in Arthur Miller’s classic but timelessly terrifying drama The Crucible, no protagonist escapes these feelings. Set in…

The Most Beautiful World in the World: Friedrich Kunath, White Cube, London.

Review by Matt Swain White Cube Hoxton Square presents the first solo UK exhibition by Friedrich Kunath. Born in Germany and based in Los Angeles…

Two Events @ V&A – Friday Late: Yohji Yamamoto at Play and Fashion in Motion: Yohji Yamamoto

To celebrate the V&A’s current Yohji Yamamoto retrospective, the V&A will stage two events exploring the influential Japanese designer’s work and offer the chance for…

Journeys & Location: Frank Bowling RA, ROLLO Contemporary Art, London.

Review by Emily Sack, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. Six years after being elected…

New Connections Within The Polyphonic Whole: Janet Cardiff, Fabrica Gallery, Brighton

Review by Amy Knight Sound has, perhaps more than any other sensory stimulation, a transcendental power that can immerse the listener in an all-encompassing awareness…

The Globe Shrinks for Those Who Own It: Barbara Kruger, Sprüth Magers, London.

Review by Laura Bushell There’s a game children play when they want to enrage their siblings; that of repeating verbatim everything the other says. Maintained…

Two Portrayals of Life: Miroslav Tichý and Shimabuku’s My Teacher Tortoise, Wilkinson Gallery, London.

Review by Mallory Nanny, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. Located in the lively art…

Sam Knowles, Fearful Sphere, at Simon Oldfield Gallery, London

Sam Knowles’ first solo exhibition, Fearful Sphere opens tonight in London. Knowles’ (b.1983) practice deals with metaphysical concerns, and the notion that the world…

Ian Hamilton Finlay | Definitions at Victoria Miro, London

By Sarah Richter, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. Ian Hamilton Finlay’s show currently at…

Vija Celmins, Television and Disaster (1964 – 1966), LACMA, LA.

Review by Jareh Das Los Angeles County Museum of Art presents an intimate exhibition of Vija Celmins works, focusing on the artist’s time in Los…

Articulating Sounds As Visual Imagery: Sam Belinfante, Penumbra, mima, Middlesborough

Review by Jareh Das As you approach mima (Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art) in Centre Square the viewer is confronted by a resounding female operatic…

The Wider Narratives of the Middle East: Rabih Mroué, The People Are Demanding, Iniva, London.

Review by Jareh Das Lebanese artist, theatre director, playwright and actor, Rabih Mroué presents his first UK solo show at iniva which centres around ongoing…

Predominantly Political Art? Peter Kennard, At Earth, Raven Row, London

Review by Kara Magid, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond, The American International University in London. Painters George Shaw and Karla…

Contemporary Lighting Design: WOKA, Vienna

WOKA was born in 1900, they produce handmade reproductions of exclusive lighting-fixtures from the early 20th century. Handmade in Vienna, with original tools using the…

Manipulations of Form, Weight and Volume: Michael Sailstorfer, Modern Art Oxford

Review by Matt Swain Modern Art Oxford hosts Michael Sailstorfer’s first solo presentation in the UK, comprising mixed-media sculptural interventions exploring notions of flight, movement…

Francis Alÿs: A Story of Deception, MoMA, New York.

Francis Alÿs: A Story of Deception at The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 opens on 8 May, drawing upon MoMA’s unique and important…

Experiments in Space Exploration: Secret Satellites, Belfast Exposed.

Review by Angela Darby For the exhibition Secret Satellites curated by Karen Downey, the Belfast Exposed gallery has been divided into three distinct sections. The…

Arab Spring: Hesam Rahmaniam, Paradise Row, London.

Review by Jessica Jones-Berney It is with acerbic wit that Iranian-born artist Hesam Rahmanian deplores the rapidly unravelling fabric of his native land, consumed by…

Contemporary sculpture in Croatia + Hungarian reflections, Hungarian National Gallery

Review by Adam Harangozó For the opening event of the Croatian Culture Months, the Hungarian National Gallery has arranged a rich exhibition from the works…

Cross-generational Dialogues: Margaret Harrison & The Girls, PayneShurvell, London

Review by Laura Barone,, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. It’s only April, but what…

The Outsider: Still Lives, Robert Lenkiewicz, Royal West of England Academy, Bristol

Review by Regina Papachlimitzou Speaking in relation to the second major controversy he triggered in a course of a creatively chaotic life (namely, his deal…

Everyday Scenarios & Complex Iconography: Paul Graham, Whitechapel Gallery, London.

Review by Emily Sack, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. A visit to Whitechapel Gallery…

Contemporary Russian Discourse: Practice For Everyday Life, Calvert 22, London.

Review by Sarah Richter, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. Calvert 22 is a not…

Joan Miró at Tate Modern: The Ladder of Escape

Review by Ruby Beelsey The latest in a string of blockbuster shows at Tate Modern, Joan Miró needs no introduction. As one of the defining…

The Post-Photographic Era: Alastair Cook, Analogue Decay, Howden Park Centre

Review by Colin Herd The names of difficult-to-get-hold-of and in some cases discontinued-altogether photographic film have something of the poetry of a catalogue of obscure…

The Future of Arts Engagement: A Sense of Perspective: Tate Liverpool

Review by Kenn Taylor A Sense of Perspective deals with the in between and the undefined, in a groundbreaking exhibition developed and curated by young…

Perspectives On A Charged Political Present: Huang Yong Ping and Wael Shawky, Nottingham Contemporary

Interview by Bethany Rex Nottingham Contemporary is one of the largest and most ambitious contemporary art spaces in the UK. Designed by Caruso St John…

Concepts of Memory and Time: Gary Simmons, Simon Lee Gallery, London

Review by Sarah Richter a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. Haven’t we all wondered if…

V&A: Exhibition Road Competition

Review by Nathan Breeze If you’re a regular visitor to the V&A you would have noticed a gradual and ambitious series of renovations and expansions…

It’s Gonna Work Out Fine: Lisa Slominski, Tenderpixel, London

Review by Laura E. Barone, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. The space at Tenderpixel…

The Interaction between Classical Music, Theatre and Film: Michel van der Aa, Barbican, London

Review by Nathan Breeze Touring six major European culture halls, Liebestod was a cross-genre performance by the Amsterdam Sinfonietta exploring the interaction between Classical Music…

A Multitude of Soap Bubbles which Explode from Time to Time: Pino Pascali, Camden Arts Centre, London

Review by Paul Hardman This exhibition, the first dedicated to Pino Pascali in the UK, focuses on works from 1967 and 1968, the last few…

Examining and Unravelling: Yellow Wallpaper, Bo.Lee, Bath

Review by Regina Papachlimitzou Yellow Wallpaper, inspired by Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s story of the same name, examines and unravels themes of spatial confinement, escape and…

Deconstructing Photography: Rashid Rana, Lisson Gallery, London

Review by Emily Sack, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. Lisson Gallery’s newest exhibition highlights…

The Filthy Reality of Everyday Life: Dirt @ Wellcome Collection, London

Review by Carla MacKinnon Wellcome Collection, a free visitor destination for the incurably curious has established an excellent name for itself as one of London’s…

Digital Tenderness: Clare Price, Charlie Dutton Gallery, London

Interview by Bethany Rex Clare Price’s new work represents a departure from the strictures of her previous work. Whilst adhering to the familiar formalist rules…

Wonders of the Universe: Beyond Ourselves @ The Royal Society, London

Interview by Bethany Rex Featuring works by Agata Agatowska, Geraldine Cox, Chris Dunseath, Sam Knowles, David Rickard and Chooc Ly Tan, Beyond Ourselves opens tomorrow…

The Cult of Beauty: The Aesthetic Movement 1860-1900 @ V&A, London

Review by Laura E. Barone, a candidate for the MA in Art History at Richmond the American International University in London. The Victoria and Albert’s…

Contemporary Scottish Culture: AHM Symposium

Review by Alistair Quietsch With the recent announcement of the Arts Council England (ACE) cuts and funding decisions, the disbandment of the UK Film Council…

Outpost – Critical Spaces @ Trafó House of Contemporary Arts, Budapest

Review by Adam Harangozó Stepping into the exhibition, it’s immediately evident why it is called Critical Spaces. It is in a small room, and all…

Ursula von Rydingsvard: Working

Von Rydingsvard’s art is deeply personal, confronting the artist’s hardship. This essay is sensitive, yet critically engages with the works and presents an overview of the artist’s four decade career.

In the Face of Silence

Presenting an intimate portrait of the lives of French farmers from the Forez region, on the eastern side of the Massif Central, In the Face of Silence is a powerful and emotive account.

Protest Stencil Toolkit

With the die-cut stencils and stencil typeface this book provides, it’s tempting to go straight outside and start marking your territory, however there is a wider message at play here.

Five Bells

Gail Jones, twice nominated for the Orange Prize and once for the Man Booker Prize, explores the lives and pasts of strangers in her latest offering.

Reality Hunger

Is the novel dead? Is art theft? Can you copyright reality? These are just some of the questions asked (and answered) in David Shields’ manifesto, Reality Hunger.

Submarine

Adrian Mole for the new generation, Oliver Tate is a wonderfully bright narrator and Dunthorne captures the bittersweet melancholy of the teenage years with great wit and honesty.

Iconic Image-making

To stand up in the world of fashion photography takes hard work, skill and endless amounts of creativity. Pedro Janeiro is a rising-star in this genre.