Diversity, Creativity & Charisma

The Room of Lost Things was inspired by Duffy’s surroundings. “Faisal, our local dry cleaner said, ‘You should write about a dry cleaner. We know people’s secrets’.”

Social, Cultural and Political

Sean’s latest collection, The Drowned Book continues his critical success, winning both the prestigious Forward and T S Eliot Prizes in 2007.

Sarah Waters

Sarah Waters has brought the genre of lesbian historical fiction into the mainstream. In 2003, she was named one of Granta’s Best Young British Writers

Daljit Nagra

The words of Daljit Nagra illuminate his emotional perception. “Poetry allows you to be intense, because to some degree people expect it.”

Carol Birch

Carol Birch found instant success as a writer with her first novel, Life in the Palace, going on to win the David Higham Award for the Best First Novel of the Year.

Mary Gaitskill

Veronica is Gaitskill’s second novel, combining the decadence and debauchery of the 1980s, where Alison and Veronica, collide against the backdrop of New York.

Jack Mapanje

This year Jack Mapanje was nominated for The Forward Prize for Best Collection for his latest and highly acclaimed collection, Beasts of Nalunga (2007).

Sophie Woolley

Sophie Woolley is a dynamic force of innovation. As both a writer and a performer, she excels at fashioning believably satiric portraits.

Julian Gough

Times are strange for Julian Gough. The London-born, Galway-bred author spent seven years trying to revolutionise the novel with his ambitious Jude.

Jackie Kay

Kay’s latest work, Darling, published in October 2007, brings together into a vibrant new book many favourite poems from her four Bloodaxe collections.

Caryl Phillips

Caryl Phillips shows no signs of becoming any less prolific. His novel, Foreigners: Three English Lives, is a combination of historical fact, reportage and fiction.

Helen Oyeyemi

Helen Oyeyemi’s first novel, The Icarus Girl, was written while she was studying for her A-levels, and tells the story of a girl growing up between two cultures.

Sandra Newman

Sandra Newman is back with her new novel Cake, after 2002’s The Only Good Thing Anyone Has Ever Done brought her the First Book Award from The Guardian.

Linton Kwesi Johnson

After 30 years of writing, recording, and activism, Linton Kwesi Johnson is being honored with the publication of Selected Poems in the Penguin Classics series.

David Mitchell

David Mitchell is faithful to fiction to the point where he describes the idea of a clinch with scriptwriting or an embrace with poetry as akin to being adulterous.

Patience Agbabi

Patience Agbabi — talented writer, performer, lecturer, and now mum to one-and-a-half year-old Solomon, is anything but her namesake.

Benjamin Zephaniah

Benjamin Zephaniah is one of the UK’s most renowned novelists, playwrights, poets and activists, and has contributed to literature over the last three decades.

Ngugi wa Thiong’o

One of African literature’s forerunners, Ngugi wa Thiong’o is the author of several novels, plays, and non-fiction works which tackle colonialism and postcolonialism.