6—1977—Torino—1°-magg
5.-Vestito-natura-anguria
6.-Angurie-mostra-CCC
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Piero Gilardi: Collaborative Effects, Nottingham

Turin-based artist Piero Gilardi comes to Nottingham Contemporary to present Collaborative Effects. Running from 26 January until 7 April, Gilardi has engaged with ecological and socio-political issues for years. A pioneer of socially-aware art practices, his work emphasises concept, process, site, collaboration and participation.

In the late 1960s Gilardi was an influential figure in the development of Turin’s Arte Povera. This movement continues to have an impact on contemporary art today and Collaborative Effects reflects his radical approach to collaboration, both within the art world and outside of it. The 22 years covered in this exhibition span his interactive sculptures and his radical social and political creative work with movements in Italy and around the world.

One of his most celebrated interactive sculptures, The Nature Carpets, is on show in this new exhibition. Made from hand-painted and carved foam, these highly realistic slices of nature challenge the use of an artwork, as Gilardi originally encouraged visitors to lie on them, picnic on them or carpet their homes with them. Other interactive sculptures were designed to be worn as costumes. Collaborative Effects is literally a collaborative effort between artist and viewer. Exhibited alongside Nottingham-based artist, John Newling, these two artists brilliantly demonstrate the role of creativity in the questioning of reality.

Piero Gilardi: Collaborative Effects, 26 January until 7 April, Nottingham Contemporary, Weekday Cross, Nottingham, NG1 2GB.

Credits
1. Piero Gilardi, “Andreottile” performance for May Day, Turin, 1977. Courtesy of the artist.
2. Piero Gilardi, Angurie, (Watermelons) 1967. Courtesy of the artist.
3. Piero Gilardi, Vestito Natura-Anguria, (Nature Watermelon Dress) 1967, Courtesy of the artist.
4. Piero Gilardi, performance during Turin CGIL strike, 2011, Courtesy of the artist.

 

 

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