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Aesthetica Art Prize 2014 People’s Choice Award Winner: Sybille Neumeyer

Votes have been counted for the Aesthetica Art Prize People’s Choice Award, and we are delighted to announce that Sybille Neumeyer is the winner. Visitors voted for their favourite artwork in the group show between 4 April and 22 June, which presented the finalists from the Aesthetica Art Prize along with a further 92 artworks from the longlist displayed on monitors within the gallery.

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The Press: Aesthetica Art Prize Raised to £5,000

The Aesthetica Art Prize is open for entries, with a new prize of £5,000 for the Main Prize Winner in addition to group exhibition, publication in an anthology of 100 top emerging artists and editorial coverage in Aesthetica Magazine. Artists in a significant point in their career have a unique opportunity to further their engagement in the international art world. The Press reports on the importance of this new award.

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PhotoIreland Festival, Dublin

The theme for the fifth edition of PhotoIreland Festival is Truth, Fact, Fiction, Lies. Looking at how photography is used for storytelling, the festival presents 27 photographers exhibiting in various venues around the city centre.

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Arik Levy, Uncontrolled Nature, Louise Alexander Gallery, Porto Cervo, Sardinia.

The Louise Alexander Gallery in Sardinia presents Arik Levy’s first solo show at the gallery. Uncontrolled Nature features a collection of new work in combination with older pieces and Levy showcases a wide range of sculptures that exist like a trail of landmarks alongside paintings and other artworks. Shown for the first time are RockTripleShift and RockTripleFusion Vertical, his ambitious new pieces displaying contrast between fusion and separation – a representation of both the horizontal and the vertical.

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The Photographic Object, 1970, Hauser & Wirth, New York

Peter Bunnell’s 1970 MoMA show Photography Into Sculpture proved a landmark in photographic practise, through its presentation of photographic images arranged in a sculptural manner, and it also gave valuable national exposure to photography as a highly-innovative contemporary art discipline. As well as capturing the revolutionary mood of the times, by showcasing artists working at the vanguard of what was occurring socially, politically, and technologically, it was an exhibition whose legacy continues to exert an influence on photographic practice today.

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The Human Factor: The Figure in Contemporary Sculpture, Hayward Gallery, London

Part of the Southbank Centre’s Festival of Love, The Human Factor will bring together major works from 25 leading international artists across the last 25 years. The artists involved have all fashioned new ways of using the figure in contemporary sculpture and confront the question of human representation today. The exhibition focuses on sculpture that explores a variety of social, political, cultural and historical concerns and it incorporates diverse references from science fiction to war monuments.

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Review of Spencer Finch: The Skies can’t keep their secret

Spencer Finch has on the wall of his studio a postcard of a watercolour by Turner. Impressed by its dynamic of figuration and abstraction, and the fluidity of the watercolour echoing the motions of the sea, Finch seems always to have had Turner in mind with his own manipulations of the elements. Taking as his starting point Turner’s A Wreck (possibly related to Longships Lighthouse, Land’s End) (1834-40), Finch has selected from the Tate collection works on paper by Turner of the Margate coast. Displayed in a dimly lit corridor before you enter the exhibition, these works are a window onto the very world that Finch employs – a world of ever-changing light.

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Genius Loci: Spirit of Place, Palazzo Franchetti, Venice, Italy

This summer the Lisson Gallery collaborates with Berengo Studio to present an exhibition that coincides with the occasion of the 14th International Architecture Biennale in Venice. The show examines the complex spheres of the public realm and the built environment, existing beyond the walls of the museum or gallery space. In this manner public art can help define the landscape it inhabits, functioning either harmoniously or in dialogue with its environment.

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Shelagh Wakely, Camden Arts Centre, London

This summer the Camden Arts Centre dedicates all of its galleries and gardens to a large-scale, major exhibition of work by Shelagh Wakely (b.1932 – d.2011). One of the UK’s most influential artists, the exhibition provides the rare opportunity to experience the ephemeral magic of Wakely’s work.

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Review of Ai Weiwei: According to What? Brooklyn Museum

Ai Weiwei is a master craftsman. Over the years, some critics have suggested he is a great activist but not a good artist. However, Weiwei’s work in porcelain, marble and wood, in particular, is astonishingly complex and comparable in vision and execution to the design talents of Leonardo Da Vinci. Running at the Brooklyn Museum until 10 August, Ai Weiwei: According to What? surveys a wide selection of the artist’s work from 1983 to the present.

Interview with Aesthetica Art Prize 2014 Winner Sybille Neumeyer

German artist Sybille Neumeyer stunned judges with her eloquent piece, Song for the Last Queen (2013) in the Aesthetica Art Prize, a beautiful light installation comprised of 7,614 bees collected from a naturally collapsed beehive framed within vials of natural honey. Captivating at first glance, the work also invites audiences to reflect upon global issues and imbalances in our ecosystem; at once appreciating the pure and natural beauty of raw materials while confronting the growing gap between consumption and food production, as bees face an ever-rising risk of decline. We speak to Neumeyer about her practice and what inspired her to enter the Aesthetica Art Prize.

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Narrating Objects: Unlocking the Stories of Sculpture, Leeds Art Gallery, Leeds

Leeds Art Gallery presents its new sculpture collection, showcasing a number of recent acquisitions for the first time. The display is designed to explore the relationship between sculture and narrative, unlocking the stories that surround key works in the Leeds collection. All sculptures contain stories, whether they are the result of the artist’s thinking, the process of making, display or reception, or the context in which the works are experienced. Inevitably, these narratives influence the ways in which the art is perceived and, in turn, help to shape our understanding of the world.