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Last Seen Entering The Biltmore, South London Gallery.

With a title which references the infamous Black Dahlia murder in 1940s Hollywood,  Last Seen Entering The Biltmore is a group exhibition which considers the idea of artifice and theatricality and particularly draws attention to the idea of the theatrical “backstage” as a threshold where transformation takes place. It also addresses the wider subject of the mediation of experience, whether by the theatre curtain or the computer screen.

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Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan: Swing It! The Orangery, Wakefield

A secret garden in the heart of a city becomes a space for rediscovering and celebrating the joy and freedom of childhood play, in a new commission which brings together the talents of award-winning artists Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan. The artists say they want to create a place which enables people’s imaginations to run away, and the Orangery gardens, a tranquil green space surrounding a listed building, which is rarely open to the public, proves the ideal setting for them to explore both the idea of play and visitors’ fond memories of playing.

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Sharon Lockhart at FACT, Liverpool

When a nine-year-old girl’s strong character began to shape a work in progress by artist and filmmaker Sharon Lockhart, it was the unlikely beginning of an ongoing creative collaboration – whose latest results can be seen in a new commission for the Liverpool Biennial.

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Interview with Bob and Roberta Smith

Bob and Roberta Smith’s Art Party is due to open on 21 August. The feature film, produced with director Tim Newton and Stuart Cameron of Crescent Arts, and distributed by Cornerhouse Artist Film, will be accompanied by a UK-wide Art Party hosted by key venues who are screening the film and hosting their own parties afterwards. There will be major art events at venues including Cornerhouse, Manchester, ICA, London, Chapterhouse, Cardiff and Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough – joined by cinemas, art galleries and art schools across the UK from Derry to Exeter, Newcastle to Margate, Liverpool to Leeds. Bob and Roberta Smith speaks to Aesthetica about the important role of art in education. 

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Liverpool Contemporary Arts Fair, 3-6 July

In conjunction with the opening of the Liverpool Biennial this weekend, Liverpool Contemporary Arts Fair launches at World Museum today. Running until 6 July, the event is Britain’s newest international art fair, showcasing work by emerging and established artists from over 50 leading national and international galleries. Part of the the cultural programme for the UK’s International Festival for Business, the inaugural edition of the fair opens with a VIP launch and preview opening night on 3 July.

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Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs at Tate Modern, London

Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs currently on display on the second floor of the Tate Modern brings together an extensive array of Matisse’s cut-outs from a long list of private and public collections. The exhibition dedicates 14 rooms to Matisse who was, in his earlier years stretching from the end of the 1900s to the brink of mid-1910s, the most courageous painter out of all the Fauvists. Matisse’s earlier paintings and sculptures transmitted passion and a buzzing sense of innovation but his cut-outs were really what transformed him into the artist most art-lovers admire today.

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Interview with London Design Festival Jeremy Maxwell Wintrebert

For the London Design Festival 2014, Jeremy Maxwell Wintrebert has joined forces with Champagne Perrier-Jouët to create a unique glass piece called Human Nature to be installed at the Victoria & Albert. Born in Paris but raised on the west coast of Africa, Wintrebert draws on his experience of the world to produce delicate and beautiful glass works. Creating his works at a small factory in Waldsassen, Bavaria, the artist speaks to Aesthetica about his hopes to establish a permanent studio in France and his plans for the V&A.

Memory Lane at la galerie du jour agnès b, Paris

The collective exhibition Memory Lane explicitly prompts memories as a result of reconstructed history through the means of art. Right at the entrance, it’s the series of photographs, Tito in War (1992-1995), by Milomir Kovačević, that commemorates Tito’s portrait in after-war public spaces. Covered with blood, protected by broken glass, hanging on a half-demolished wall, these 33 photographs of photographs enact the symbolism of the leader’s portrait presence and legitimises the space.

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Interview with Lizzie Cawthray, Director of Needle

Lizzie Cawthray is challenging the outdated notions of knitwear with her fresh, stylish and playful company, Needle. Cawthray aims to produce luxurious pieces that make her customers feel fantastic. After working as the knitwear product developer at LK Bennet for a number of years, Cawthray decided to focus her attentions fully on the versatile material and Needle was born. She speaks to Aesthetica about her future plans and the designers who inspire her.

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The Last Days of Troy at Shakespeare’s Globe, London

It has become a rite of passage for the contemporary poet: the attempt to rewrite classical – specifically, Hellenic – literature for the modern day. Yet though the projects seem comparable, their impulses are often wildly different. In recent years, they have ranged from the translational (Heaney’s The Burial at Thebes) to the wildly unpredictable (Hughes’s Oresteia) to the strongly interpretative (Logue’s War Music). All are united, however, in their subtlety, the way in which they adapt without abusing their poetic license. In this sense, Simon Armitage is a worthy new addition to the poet-cum-classicist Hall of Fame.

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Interview with Virginia Damtsa, Co-Founder of Riflemaker

Born in Athens, Virginia Damtsa is a contemporary art dealer and the Co-Founder of Riflemaker gallery in London. Moving to Paris when she was selected by the Opera National de Paris schools to train for a career in dance, she studied in Paris, Belgium, New York and Cambridge, England before moving to London in 1990 to continue her studies in the arts whilst working on private sales including Monet and Picasso. In 2004, she co-founded Riflemaker with Tot Taylor. Damtsa speaks to Aesthetica about her thoughts on contemporary art and her inspirations.

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Tom Vek and Olga Bell, Meltdown Festival, Southbank Centre, 20 June

In the 21 years since Meltdown’s inception, the festival has played host to a conveyor belt of counterculture greats, including David Bowie, Patti Smith, Jarvis Cocker and the late John Peel. This year James Lavelle took the helm, bringing his genre-bending brand of subversion to the director’s chair. With a body of work spanning two decades – and an illustrious address book to match – the trip-hop pioneer and all-round creative powerhouse is known for pairing unlikely bedfellows and taking big risks. This was evident at the Southbank’s Purcell Room, where Olga Bell and Tom Vek united to perform collaborations from joint venture Nothankyou alongside their own solo material.