The Next Generation: Rosaline Shahnavaz

In the Special 60th Edition of Aesthetica we celebrate the emerging photographers that are shaping the future of the image-based practice in The Next Generation. We have partnered with the London College of Communication to survey some of photography’s rising stars and showcase their fresh ideas and new concepts. Rosaline Shahnavaz has produced work for the likes of Dazed and Confused, AnOther and Art Review, she speaks to us about her interest in documentary photography and her future plans.

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Barbara Kruger at Modern Art Oxford

The world of popular culture and the devices and trends that govern it has long since been a topic explored and analysed by artists; from the screen prints of Andy Warhol to the sculptural paintings of Ken Lum. Yet Barbara Kruger, whose formative beginning in graphic design so poignantly aided in the design of her later artworks, during the 70’s and 80’s, has since gone on to become one of the most prolific and accessible artists working within this theme. Now, Modern Art Oxford pays homage to her career in a self-titled solo show, which also presents a colossal new site-specific installation in the upper galleries dressed in Kruger’s tell-tale signature aesthetic motif – scrutinising the ever evolving impact and paradoxes of the digital age.

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Review of Pencil / Line / Eraser, Carroll/Fletcher, London

The word process crops up in art speak so often it can easily become detached from its literal meaning. This is not the case at Carroll / Fletcher who use the notion of an action set in motion to connect the notion of craft to the art of the information age. It is pretty rare to find net.artists, or post-internet artists, displaying much sympathy for the medium of drawing – a positively 19th century activity to most – however several artists here do re-connect the graphic to the algorithmic by dwelling on what the drawn line shares with technology – the power of process.

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Pedro Reyes, Vasco Araújo and Akram Zaatari, The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto, Canada.

Part of the internationally-focused Harbourfront Centre, The Power Plant showcases the latest work from artists around the world. This summer it opens three exciting new exhibitions by Pedro Reyes (b. 1972), Vasco Araújo (b. 1975) and Akram Zaatari (b. 1966). Although hailing from very different backgrounds, these artists are united by their perspectives on the world and their exploration of ideas.

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Aesthetica Art Prize Call for Entries Countdown: Interview with Karl Singporewala

As the final month to enter the Aesthetica Art Prize is upon us, we catch up with last year’s longlisted artist Karl Singporewala to discover how being selected for the Prize has furthered his creative practice. Selected for his work Dial M for Monument, Singporewala now exhibits this piece in a group show for the HIX Award 2014, hosted by the Cock ‘n’ Bull Gallery in Shoreditch, London. Designed by Damien Hirst and judged by Tracey Emin among other leading art professionals, the prize presents a month long exhibition of the 20 finalists throughout August.

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Larry Clark, Tulsa – Teenage Lust, Amsterdam

Widely considered one of the most important and influential photographers of his generation, American artist Larry Clark explores youth culture through his renowned and controversial projects. This summer Foam presents two of his earliest bodies of work, the series Tulsa (1971) and Teenage Lust (1983). Concerned with revealing a culture that was hidden to the greater public, Clark’s work offers a raw and unflinching look at the realities of young urban living in the 1970s and 1980s.

Review of Here and Elsewhere, New Museum, New York

As much as it might seem provincial that non-western art is categorised by geography and ethnicity, Here and Elsewhere at the New Museum, New York, does justice to this grouping. Encompassing a vast territory of over 15 countries in the Middle East that include Iran, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Turkey, Palestine, UAE, and Morocco, the question of fetishising locality at the cost of undermining high standards of art is met head on. Here we see artistic productions by artists challenged by exile and war.

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Chasing Time, The Olympic Museum, Switzerland

Time is a key part of competitive sport, much of which is rated according to speed; it’s an essential element for designating winners and losers and establishing records.  This new exhibition at The Olympic Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland explores the concept of time as it is understood and experienced in sport.

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5 To See This Weekend

This weekend there is the chance to a series of exceptional exhibitions across the world. The art on display ranges from provocative pieces of Neo-Concretism at MoMA, New York, to 17th century still life paintings at Queensland Art Gallery. Meanwhile in London, Whitechapel Gallery presents audiences with a thought-provoking retrospective of Giulio Paolini, charting the interweaving progressions of art itself. We handpick the very best in contemporary creative production this weekend, read on to find out more.

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Mario Schifano 1960-1967, Luxembourg & Dayan, London

One of Italy’s most significant post-war painters, Mario Schifano considered painting as an intrinsically human art form capable of capturing the lifeblood of contemporary culture. This exhibition at London’s Luxembourg & Dayan displays some of his seminal works from his most artistically intense period, 1960-1967. During this decade he experimented with media and other, new techniques.

Review of Joan Fontcuberta: Stranger Than Fiction, Media Space, London

The new 525m² Media Space of London’s Science Museum plays host to Spanish photographer, Joan Fontcuberta in a surreal show which challenges the authority of museum exhibitions. Comprising six of Fontcuberta’s best-known works, Stranger Than Fiction includes not only large-scale digital prints, photograms and small analogue works but also grotesque hybrid taxidermy pieces, narrative text works, found objects and land art.

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Fiona Banner: Wp Wp Wp, Yorkshire Sculpture Park

The unusual name of this new exhibition by UK artist Fiona Banner is inspired by the sound of helicopters as portrayed in comic books and storyboards. Wp Wp Wp is an onomatopoeically named collection of works that Banner began almost two years ago. A highlight of the show is her ambitious new project Chinook. Formed from two sets of helicopter blades suspended from the ceiling of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park’s Longside Gallery, Chinook emphasises the absence of the helicopter’s body. Careful choreography rotates the blades in opposition to one another above visitor’s heads as though preparing for lift-off, overlapping and suggesting collison.