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Jenny Saville at Modern Art Oxford

Modern Art Oxford presents Jenny Saville’s first solo show in a UK public institution, an exhibition that traces Saville’s practice from the early nineties to the present day.

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Loss at Golden Thread Gallery, Belfast.

With its history of civil unrest, Belfast is an appropriate city in which to confront the sensitive issue of loss from conflict. Co-curated with the Imperial War Museum, Loss is an exhibition that explores its theme through the work of four internationally renowned artists, Jananne Al-Ani, Annabel Dover, Rozanne Hawksley and Turner Prize recipient and BAFTA award winner, Steve McQueen.

Richard Long at The Hepworth Wakefield

Seminal land artist, Richard Long, has created two new site-specific works for his latest show at The Hepworth Wakefield, which runs until 14 October. The exhibition explores the artist’s practice across his career, from early photo-based works such as A Lane Made by Walking (1967) and England (1968), to later sculptures Willow Sticks (1980) and Cornish Slate Ellipse (2009). Whilst it’s a pleasure to revisit these works, Long’s china clay wall-work provides the highlight. Watch the artist hard at work creating the piece.

ARTIST ROOMS: Richard Long, 23/06/2012 until 14/10/2012, The Hepworth Wakefield, Gallery Walk, Wakefield, West Yorkshire, WF1 5AW. www.hepworthwakefield.org

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Preview – Art & Anarchy at the East End Film Festival, from Tuesday 3rd July.

The East End Film Festival (EEFF) is now one of the biggest international film events in the UK. Their 6-day programme of features, documentaries and shorts, including 14 world premieres, is a highlight of the summer arts scene that attracts a truly cosmopolitan audience to London’s “most artistic quarter”. Despite this formidable reputation, the festival remains close to its East End roots – and with a special focus on local filmmakers, this year’s programme is a superb showcase of British filmmaking – particularly in the realm of artist film.

This year, EEFF’s reputation is enhanced by its association with the London Olympics. The festival’s combination of international diversity and local celebration is an ideal embodiment of the Olympic spirit, and as the only film festival operating within the Olympic zone during the Olympic period, the EEFF organisers have taken this unique position to the very heart of the festival.

The East End Festival programme presents five themes, a reference to the five Olympic rings that represents five aspects of the challenging and dynamic energies of the East End: Resistance & Revolution, Art & Anarchy, Identity & Displacement, Out & Proud and Fun & Games. Each interlocking “ring” interacts with its neighbour, reflecting the diversity of the festival: yet each is also a separate entity that allows its content to shine in its own right. “Art & Anarchy” provides a dedicated platform for artist film unprecedented at EEFF – and as this strand of screenings reflects the interlocking pieces of Aesthetica’s own creative heart, here’s a sneak preview of what’s to come!

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Child Hood – The Real Event, The Royal Academy, London.

Here is a story about a little girl… Her name is Alleycat. Perhaps you’ve seen her; she wanders the streets in a green hoodie with a little leopard who keeps her company. She sleeps in bushes and boiler rooms and hunts through supermarket bins for food. Her favourite is pizza, even if it’s mouldy. Alleycat has no home – what was meant to be her home was a source of violence and maltreatment. Instead, she curls up in the tumble-driers of drycleaners hoping someone will find her and take care of her. But again and again, she finds herself back on the streets with only Leopard to comfort her.

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Josef Herman: Warsaw, Brussels, Glasgow, London, 1938-44 at The Royal West of England Academy, Bristol.

Joseph Herman:Warsaw,Brussels,Glasgow,London, 1938-44 focuses on the formative years of Herman’s prolific career, which spanned seven decades. Born in Warsaw in 1911, the artist fled, in 1938, to Brussels and then London to escape mounting anti-Semitism in Poland. Poignant, doleful, and exquisitely tender, Herman’s showcased work displays a wide range of artistic accomplishment attained in only a short period of time.